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Elvis Presley traffic lights appear in German town of Friedberg - DW (English)

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Germany. The most famous are the Ampelmännchen in Berlin. Created in 1961 in what was then East Berlin, they now appear all over the united capital. The city of Augsburg now has the Kasperl puppet character in a pointed hat, Mainz has its own Mainzelmännchen, Bonn has Beethoven traffic lights and in Trier a small, chubby Karl Marx lets pedestrians know when to cross. The eastern town of Erfurt has had up to 14 different kinds of lights since the 1980s. 40 years after his death, Elvis reaches fans from beyond the grave From small town boy to household name Born in the town of Tupelo, Mississippi, Presley began his career in Memphis, Tennessee. He is pictured here in 1954 while recording at the famous Sun Studio in Memphis, which also helped launch B.B. King's career. Quickly rising to fame, his first hit, "Heartbreak Hotel," propelled him into stardom in 1956. 40 years after his death, Elvis reaches fans from beyond the grave A GI in Germany Presley put his career on hold while serving in the US military in Germany from 1958 to 1960. Stationed in the small town of Friedberg, Presley stayed in a hotel in nearby Bad Nauheim instead of living in the barracks. There, he lived with an entourage: his grandmother, father and two body guards. Today, hotel guests can sleep in the Elvis Room, which was preserved to commemorate the King's stay. 40 years after his death, Elvis reaches fans from beyond the grave Made in Germany Although he was prohibited from performing during service, the King still found time to make music. Germany was the birthplace of two chart-toppers: "One Night" and "A Fool Such as I." He also gave global fame to the popular German folk song, "Muss I denn zum Städtele hinaus," or in English, "Wooden Heart." img itemprop="image" src="https://www.dw.com/image/16162468_303.jpg" title="Elvis Presley Museum opening (picture-...https://www.dw.com/en/elvis-presley-traffic-lights-appear-in-german-town-of-friedberg/a-46610723

If it's good enough for Germany, it's good enough for Bantams argues owner

Thursday, June 21, 2018

He shares this status alongside Hoffenheim manager Julian Nagelsmann, 30, who also enjoyed a campaign of outstanding success last term.Other thirtysomethings managing in the top tier include Augsburgs Manuel Baum, Werder Bremens Florian Kohfeldt and Sandro Schwarz of Mainz, with Rahic hoping that the flower of youth can also now blossom to positive effect at City. It is not about the age, but the knowledge about football. The circumstances are so important and if we trust each other and have the same understanding, if we bring it all together and get this bonding, then I think we have a massive chance. Edin Rahic Rahic said: In Germany, Schalke are second with a coach who started at 30. They are in the Champions League now.Third (last season) were Hoffenheim, who are also in the Champions League. Nagelsmann started at 28 or 29.It is not about the age, but the knowledge about football. The circumstances are so important and if we trust each other and have the same understanding, if we bring it all together and get this bonding, then I think we have a massive chance.Just as the notion of giving young, homegrown managers and coaches a chance is becoming increasingly fashionable in Germany, so Rahic feels that domestic trend can take off in England while also believing that the notion of promoting from within is both a sound and responsible one.The benefits of continuity in both Collins and Drury both knowing the working environment at the club and players they are working with on a daily basis represents another important factor, according to Rahic, alongside their ‘local knowledge.The first-team squad members who reconvene in pre-season training on June 28 will include a senior defender in Matt Kilgallon who is a couple of years older than Collins and Drury at 34, with captain Romain Vincelot being the same age, while Nathaniel Knight-Percival is 31.But Rahic does not see any issues whatsoever – only plus points.It is massive because they (Collins and Drury) are Yorkshire lads. They know the club and they are proud to be here, he added.They know the circumstances unlike a German coach who say does not speak English. They know the players and that is a massive benefit.They also have never applied for the job. They showed me how they saw a chance, but never forced it. https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/sport/football/bradford-city/if-it-s-good-enough-for-germany-it-s-good-enough-for-bantams-argues-owner-1-9213761

Driving Germany's 'Romantic Road' - Condé Nast Traveler

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Best to keep passing through until your first stop, about an hour and a half north, in Augsburg, Bavaria's oldest city (and originally a Roman town). Grab a bite outside at a cafe on the Maximilianstrasse, to take it all in, before heading to the Fuggerei, a walled Roman Catholic housing complex for the poor built in the early 1500s by Jakob Fugger. It still serves as subsidized housing to this day, and you can take a tour of one of the homes, peeking into the spartan but welcoming living room, bedroom, and kitchen. There's also a complicated history of the Fuggerei's rebirth following a WWII bombing raid, made all the more real by the mini-museum's setting in a bunker.Take a breath and get back on the road. You can swing by Harburg Castle, or choose Dinkelsbühl as your next overnight, but we decided to push on a little farther to Rothenburg. So glad we did—we could have a stayed a full weekend here. After checking in to Burg-Hotel—another impossibly pretty place in a monastery garden, with views upstairs of the Tauber Valley—we happened upon the free sundown walking tour of the town, getting started in the market square. It took us to the outer wall, and along backroads where restaurants were just starting to turn their lights on. The Alt-Rothenburger Handwerkerhaus is a fun detour to see a 700-year-old house and the remains of artisans' workshops—coopers, weavers, cobblers and potters. It all looks like a film set or a Disney theme park—but then again, film sets and theme parks are made to look like this.Day 3: After lingering in Rothenburg for a late breakfast, drive out for the last, hour-and-change stretch to Würzburg outside Frankfurt, where the wine impresses as much as the city's focal point—the Residenz, an 18th-century Baroque palace. A meal of asparagus, filet mignon, and lots (and lots!) of local riesling at Bürgerspital restaurant caps off a drive that actually lives up to its billing.

Higley, Butch - Dothan Eagle

Thursday, March 15, 2018

February 21, 2018. Butch was born in Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, on November 8, 1947. His father served as a career Army officer, and the family lived in many places in the United States and in Augsburg, Germany. Butch graduated from Cleveland Heights High School in 1965. He received a Bachelor of Science degree in Mathematics from Florida State University in 1969, and a Master of Science degree in Computer Science from Georgia Institute of Technology in 1992. He served in the United States Army and later worked as a Computer Scientist on a Department of Defense research team at Georgia Tech until his retirement to Jackson County in 2006. Butch was known to his family and friends as someone who loved his family, enjoyed helping others, and loved the Lord. He had been a member of the First Baptist Church of Marianna for twelve years and served as a deacon there. He enjoyed working outdoors and playing golf with good friends. He is survived by his wife, Gayle Melzer Higley, his children, Krista (Antonio) Sandoval of Overland Park, Kansas, Clint (Mara) Higley of Sharpsburg, Georgia, and Mary Nell (Robert) Summey of Decatur, Georgia, as well as his three beloved grandchildren, Isabelle and Hannah Sandoval and Elijah Barrow. He is also survived by three sisters, Margaret Gower of Naples, Florida, Martha Wargo of Akron, Ohio, and Patricia Edrich of New Port Richey, Florida, and a brother, Arthur Higley of Hixson, Tennessee. Butch was preceded in death by his parents, Mary Myrtle Isbell and Howard Cogswell Higley, and his sister, Mary Abby Hollett. Funeral services will...http://www.dothaneagle.com/jcfloridan/obituaries/higley-butch/article_85decfee-a574-564f-80df-587a0ab5854e.html

Travel: Germany's answer to Vancouver and Whistler is worth the trip - BCBusiness

Saturday, December 8, 2018

But B.C.s favourite winter wonderland lacks the old-timey charm of Berchtesgaden. And while some aspects of the Bavarian retreats history are undoubtedly regrettable (thanks to historical museum Dokumentation Obersalzberg and its 170,000 visitors in 2017, the village doesnt shy away from its past), others have aged well. A trip across a lake named K.nigssee, for example, yields the Church of St. Bartholom., built in the 12th century, plus a family-run food stand specializing in smoked trout on a bun. (Just dont ask for WiFi.) The right to fish in the lake is passed down from generation to generation, with only one person holding the right to catch at any given time. Not a bad business model. Speaking of which, two other notable commercial endeavours in the region that have stood the test of time are lederhosen clothier Engelbert Aigner and the Grassl distillery, which specializes in schnapps. The former is another family business, though instead of monopolizing Germanys waterways, it makes artisanal lederhosen. This isnt the stuff you can find in every tourist shop in Germany for $200 a pop, either. Its the real, custom, hand-stitched item that will put you on a year-long waitlist. Apparently, the leather is a good choice in the mercurial Bavarian climate and isnt only worn during Oktoberfest. (Though if you dont sport a pair in Germany then, youre not even a tourist; youre like an alien or something.) The latter is Germanys oldest distillery, open since 1692. Grassl doesnt use any aromas or perfumes for its schnapps, either; theyre all-natural, to the point that many of the shops specialty products are still made up in the mountain ranges and barrel-aged for three years. Berchtesgaden has also cornered the market on a certain Olympic sport with a massive luge/bobsled track that German athletes flock to in all seasons. It seems like a perfect little paradise, but as with all such places, our time here is too short. Keep Munich weirdAfter another bus ride through the mountains, we arrive in the capital of the state of Bavaria. Spotless Munich is one of the richest areas of Europe, but there are some eccentricities amid the beautiful buildings that shape the city centre. Perhaps chief among them is the Rathaus-Glockenspiel, basically a huge merry-go round, atta...https://www.bcbusiness.ca/Travel-Germanys-answer-to-Vancouver-and-Whistler-is-worth-the-trip

Germany’s new Green divide - POLITICO.eu

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Germanys Social Democrats would do well to look at the neighborhood of Haidhausen in central Munich. For centuries, the area was known as the poorhouse of the Bavarian capital; after post-war reconstruction, it became a dilapidated workers quarter, described as a district of broken glass for its rundown condition. About half of all apartments had no bathroom and no hot water, the magazine Der Spiegel wrote in 1980. Even fewer had access to central heating. Over the past few decades, however, the neighborhood has flourished thanks in no small part to a large-scale redevelopment plan initiated by the SPD-led city government in the early 1970s. Gentrification has taken hold. Residents are younger and rents are higher than the Munich average. Trendy cafes, expensive bicycles and organic shops cluster around the districts picturesque squares. Given Haidhausens history, its no surprise that the Social Democrats were the dominant party in this area for decades at least until recently. In Bavarias state election in October, the SPD suffered a colossal defeat in the Munich-Mitte constituency to which Haidhausen belongs, its vote share shrinking by t...https://www.politico.eu/article/germany-green-party-haidhausen-munich-elections-social-democrats-spd-is-the-new-red/

Bavaria election: German conservatives lose their fizz - BBC News

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Every autumn, lederhosen-clad drinkers crowd into vast tents festooned with dried hop flowers, to celebrate Bavaria's most intoxicating export. Waitresses bearing fistfuls of beer glasses squeeze between packed wooden benches. It's hard to make much out above the brass band music but, listen closely this year, and the talk is of politics. Just like Oktoberfest, Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative sister party is woven into the checked fabric of Bavarian culture. The Christian Social Union (CSU) has ruled Germany's richest state since 1957, sharing power just once in a coalition with the free-market FDP. And since then, every Bavarian prime minister has risen from its ranks. But now, swift as a reveller draining his tankard, support has ebbed away. The CSU is bracing itself for humiliating losses in today's Bavarian state election. The party is on course to lose the absolute majority its leaders once took for granted. This is likely to be an historic election which will define Bavaria's very identity, encapsulated in the word "Heimat" (homeland). "In this...https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-45835795

Bavaria election: German conservatives lose their fizz

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Every autumn, lederhosen-clad drinkers crowd into vast tents festooned with dried hop flowers, to celebrate Bavaria's most intoxicating export. Waitresses bearing fistfuls of beer glasses squeeze between packed wooden benches. It's hard to make much out above the brass band music but, listen closely this year, and the talk is of politics. Just like Oktoberfest, Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative sister party is woven into the checked fabric of Bavarian culture. The Christian Social Union (CSU) has ruled Germany's richest state since 1957, sharing power just once in a coalition with the free-market FDP. And since then, every Bavarian prime minister has risen from its ranks. But now, swift as a reveller draining his tankard, support has ebbed away. The CSU is bracing itself for humiliating losses in today's Bavarian state election. The party is on course to lose the absolute majority its leaders once took for granted. This is likely to be an historic election which will define Bavaria's very identity, encapsulated in the word "Heimat" (homeland). "In this...https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-45835795