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Bavaria election: German conservatives lose their fizz - BBC News

Saturday, December 8, 2018

The Christian Social Union (CSU) has ruled Germany's richest state since 1957, sharing power just once in a coalition with the free-market FDP. And since then, every Bavarian prime minister has risen from its ranks. But now, swift as a reveller draining his tankard, support has ebbed away. The CSU is bracing itself for humiliating losses in today's Bavarian state election. The party is on course to lose the absolute majority its leaders once took for granted. This is likely to be an historic election which will define Bavaria's very identity, encapsulated in the word "Heimat" (homeland). "In this election every party claims the term 'Heimat' for themselves," says businessman Franz Bergmüller. "What matters is who defends the values of Heimat." As far as Mr Bergmüller is concerned, only the far-right, anti-migrant Alternative for Germany (AfD) party does that. He is one of their leading candidates, having defected from the CSU."Heimat means that I can live in peace and quiet, with respect and tolerance for each other but it doesn't mean that I have to adapt to the people who come here with their cultures." We're talking in the wood-panelled restaurant his family have owned for generations. From the wall the figure of the crucified Christ gazes dolefully down at us. It's a common sight in Bavaria - by law crosses are displayed in classrooms - but the religious symbol has more recently taken on a political significance. Earlier this year, in what was widely perceived as an attempt to emulate AfD's anti-Islam stance, CSU Prime Minister Markus Söder ordered that crosses should be hung in all...https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-45835795

Germany’s new Green divide - POLITICO.eu

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Continent. Not every corner of the European Union has become this wealthy or gentrified, but living standards have risen everywhere; the vast majority of EU residents now live in housing with a private bathroom. The traditional working class has shrunk, the proportion of well-educated, urban voters has surged and, partly as a result, social democratic parties are crumbling. In the wake of this change, the once stark left-right divide across socioeconomic lines that defined European politics for more than a century is crumbling. In its place, a new battleground is emerging as electorates split along lines of identity and culture. Until now, this new divide has manifested itself most prominently in populist parties on the extreme right, like Alternative for Germany (AfD). The partys dramatic rise is already reshaping that part of the political spectrum from the fringes to the center, as moderate conservatives try to stop hemorrhaging voters by placing greater emphasis and in some countries shifting to the right on identity issues like cultural heritage and immigration. On the left, a corresponding phenomenon has been slow to emerge. But the Greens strong showing in Bavaria suggests a countermovement may be taking shape. In one of Germanys most prosperous states, the Greens won 18 percent of the vote and became the second-largest party. It then achieved a similar feat in the neighboring state of Hesse, where it won 20 percent of the vote. It remains to be seen whether the party will be able to cement its support and become the champion of Germanys cosmopolitan-liberal camp for years to come. In early November, the Greens overtook the rapidly deflating SPD in nationwide opinion polls. One survey put the partys support at 24 percent, just three points below that of Chancellor Angela Merkels Christian Democratic Union. In a snap election, such a result would establish the Greens as Germanys largest left-wing force an enormous leap for the once marginal party. Buoyed by these recent successes, Greens from across Europe are gathering in Berlin this weekend to rev up their campaign for next May's European Parliament election. In the minds of many German voters, the Greens have established themselves as the polar opposite of the AfD and those who adopt a similar rhetoric. I didnt have to think about it very long, it was crystal clear, says Doris Langer, 45, of her decision to vote Green in the Bavarian election. The communications specialist from Munich used to think of herself as largely apolitical and has voted for various center-left and center-right parties in the past. But when Bavarias ruling Christian Social Union, the CDUs sister party, shifted rightward particularly on migration, a subject she cares about deeply Langer saw the Greens as her only option. They are the only ones who have a liberal refugee policy, she says. Merkels sentence from 2015, that ‘We can do it, the Greens are the onl...https://www.politico.eu/article/germany-green-party-haidhausen-munich-elections-social-democrats-spd-is-the-new-red/

NordLB sucht dringend Investoren

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Private-Equity-Häuser, Landesbanken, Hedgefonds und andere Banken. Belastbare Angebote werden innerhalb von Wochen erwartet.Zu den Interessenten gehört nach Informationen aus Finanzkreisen auch wieder der US-Finanzinvestor Cerberus, der gemeinsam mit JC Flowers bereits den Zuschlag beim Verkauf der HSH Nordbank erhalten hatte. Es war die erste Privatisierung einer deutschen Landesbank. Auch der Beteiligungsgesellschaft Apollo wird Interesse an der NordLB nachgesagt. In der Politik und der Finanzaufsicht, aber auch unter Landesbanken und Sparkassen gibt es allerdings Sympathie für eine ganz andere Lösung: einen Einstieg oder gar eine Mehrheitsbeteiligung öffentlich-rechtlicher Institute. Nach Informationen des Handelsblatts interessieren sich sowohl die LBBW als auch die Helaba nach wie vor für die NordLB. Aktuelle Club-Events Mittwoch, 17.10.18, 09:30 Berlin: Handelsblatt Symposium „Insolvenzrecht Mittwoch, 17.10.18, 19:30 Köln: Literaturhaus Köln: Meg Wolitzer und ihre Geschichte von Feminismus, Liebe und Loyalität Montag, 22.10.18, 08:45 Berlin: Handelsblatt Jahrestagung „Health Dienstag, 23.10.18, 09:15 Bonn: NEOCOM 23. – 24. Oktober Montag, 05.11.18, 09:00 Wien: Handelsblatt Jahrestagung Energiewirtschaft Österreich Montag, 22.10.18 Düsseldorf: WHU – Advanced Management Program Zum Wirtschafts Club Bei einem Einstieg von einer oder mehreren Landesbanken könnte das Hannoveraner Geldhaus Mitglied im öffentlich-rechtlichen Einlagensicherungsfonds bleiben. Bei einer Beteiligung von Finanzinvestoren müsste die NordLB dagegen vermutlich in den Sicherungsfonds der privaten Banken wechseln. Dann droht wie bei der HSH Nordbank eine monatelange Debatte über die Modalitäten.„Einen komplizierten Wechsel der Einlagensi...https://www.handelsblatt.com/finanzen/banken-versicherungen/landesbank-nordlb-sucht-dringend-investoren/23146856.html

Bavaria election: German conservatives lose their fizz

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

The Christian Social Union (CSU) has ruled Germany's richest state since 1957, sharing power just once in a coalition with the free-market FDP. And since then, every Bavarian prime minister has risen from its ranks. But now, swift as a reveller draining his tankard, support has ebbed away. The CSU is bracing itself for humiliating losses in today's Bavarian state election. The party is on course to lose the absolute majority its leaders once took for granted. This is likely to be an historic election which will define Bavaria's very identity, encapsulated in the word "Heimat" (homeland). "In this election every party claims the term 'Heimat' for themselves," says businessman Franz Bergmüller. "What matters is who defends the values of Heimat." As far as Mr Bergmüller is concerned, only the far-right, anti-migrant Alternative for Germany (AfD) party does that. He is one of their leading candidates, having defected from the CSU."Heimat means that I can live in peace and quiet, with respect and tolerance for each other but it doesn't mean that I have to adapt to the people who come here with their cultures." We're talking in the wood-panelled restaurant his family have owned for generations. From the wall the figure of the crucified Christ gazes dolefully down at us. It's a common sight in Bavaria - by law crosses are displayed in classrooms - but the religious symbol has more recently taken on a political significance. Earlier this year, in what was widely perceived as an attempt to emulate AfD's anti-Islam stance, CSU Prime Minister Markus Söder ordered that crosses should be hung in all...https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-45835795

Travel: Germany's answer to Vancouver and Whistler is worth the trip - BCBusiness

Saturday, December 8, 2018

But B.C.s favourite winter wonderland lacks the old-timey charm of Berchtesgaden. And while some aspects of the Bavarian retreats history are undoubtedly regrettable (thanks to historical museum Dokumentation Obersalzberg and its 170,000 visitors in 2017, the village doesnt shy away from its past), others have aged well. A trip across a lake named K.nigssee, for example, yields the Church of St. Bartholom., built in the 12th century, plus a family-run food stand specializing in smoked trout on a bun. (Just dont ask for WiFi.) The right to fish in the lake is passed down from generation to generation, with only one person holding the right to catch at any given time. Not a bad business model. Speaking of which, two other notable commercial endeavours in the region that have stood the test of time are lederhosen clothier Engelbert Aigner and the Grassl distillery, which specializes in schnapps. The former is another family business, though instead of monopolizing Germanys waterways, it makes artisanal lederhosen. This isnt the stuff you can find in every tourist shop in Germany for $200 a pop, either. Its the real, custom, hand-stitched item that will put you on a year-long waitlist. Apparently, the leather is a good choice in the mercurial Bavarian climate and isnt only worn during Oktoberfest. (Though if you dont sport a pair in Germany then, youre not even a tourist; youre like an alien or something.) The latter is Germanys oldest distillery, open since 1692. Grassl doesnt use any aromas or perfumes for its schnapps, either; theyre all-natural, to the point that many of the shops specialty products are still made up in the mountain ranges and barrel-aged for three years. Berchtesgaden has also cornered the market on a certain Olympic sport with a massive luge/bobsled track that German athletes flock to in all seasons. It seems like a perfect little paradise, but as with all such places, our time here is too short. Keep Munich weirdAfter another bus ride through the mountains, we arrive in the capital of the state of Bavaria. Spotless Munich is one of the richest areas of Europe, but there are some eccentricities amid the beautiful buildings that shape the city centre. Perhaps chief among them is the Rathaus-Glockenspiel, basically a huge merry-go round, atta...https://www.bcbusiness.ca/Travel-Germanys-answer-to-Vancouver-and-Whistler-is-worth-the-trip

Germany’s new Green divide - POLITICO.eu

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Germanys Social Democrats would do well to look at the neighborhood of Haidhausen in central Munich. For centuries, the area was known as the poorhouse of the Bavarian capital; after post-war reconstruction, it became a dilapidated workers quarter, described as a district of broken glass for its rundown condition. About half of all apartments had no bathroom and no hot water, the magazine Der Spiegel wrote in 1980. Even fewer had access to central heating. Over the past few decades, however, the neighborhood has flourished thanks in no small part to a large-scale redevelopment plan initiated by the SPD-led city government in the early 1970s. Gentrification has taken hold. Residents are younger and rents are higher than the Munich average. Trendy cafes, expensive bicycles and organic shops cluster around the districts picturesque squares. Given Haidhausens history, its no surprise that the Social Democrats were the dominant party in this area for decades at least until recently. In Bavarias state election in October, the SPD suffered a colossal defeat in the Munich-Mitte constituency to which Haidhausen belongs, its vote share shrinking by t...https://www.politico.eu/article/germany-green-party-haidhausen-munich-elections-social-democrats-spd-is-the-new-red/

Bavaria election: German conservatives lose their fizz - BBC News

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Every autumn, lederhosen-clad drinkers crowd into vast tents festooned with dried hop flowers, to celebrate Bavaria's most intoxicating export. Waitresses bearing fistfuls of beer glasses squeeze between packed wooden benches. It's hard to make much out above the brass band music but, listen closely this year, and the talk is of politics. Just like Oktoberfest, Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative sister party is woven into the checked fabric of Bavarian culture. The Christian Social Union (CSU) has ruled Germany's richest state since 1957, sharing power just once in a coalition with the free-market FDP. And since then, every Bavarian prime minister has risen from its ranks. But now, swift as a reveller draining his tankard, support has ebbed away. The CSU is bracing itself for humiliating losses in today's Bavarian state election. The party is on course to lose the absolute majority its leaders once took for granted. This is likely to be an historic election which will define Bavaria's very identity, encapsulated in the word "Heimat" (homeland). "In this...https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-45835795

Bavaria election: German conservatives lose their fizz

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Every autumn, lederhosen-clad drinkers crowd into vast tents festooned with dried hop flowers, to celebrate Bavaria's most intoxicating export. Waitresses bearing fistfuls of beer glasses squeeze between packed wooden benches. It's hard to make much out above the brass band music but, listen closely this year, and the talk is of politics. Just like Oktoberfest, Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative sister party is woven into the checked fabric of Bavarian culture. The Christian Social Union (CSU) has ruled Germany's richest state since 1957, sharing power just once in a coalition with the free-market FDP. And since then, every Bavarian prime minister has risen from its ranks. But now, swift as a reveller draining his tankard, support has ebbed away. The CSU is bracing itself for humiliating losses in today's Bavarian state election. The party is on course to lose the absolute majority its leaders once took for granted. This is likely to be an historic election which will define Bavaria's very identity, encapsulated in the word "Heimat" (homeland). "In this...https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-45835795