Nürnberg Deutsch

Florists in Nuremberg Germany

Send flowers and gifts online for any occasion

fresh flowers Nuremberg
birthday flowers Nuremberg
funeral flowers Nuremberg
get well flowers Nuremberg
roses Nuremberg
lilies Nuremberg
plants Nuremberg
gift baskets Nuremberg

Find Florist in Nuremberg Germany


A brief history of German neo-Nazi group NSU

Thursday, August 2, 2018

German state. September 2000 — Mundlos and Boehnhardt kill Enver Simsek, a flower seller of Turkish origin, in the southern city of Nuremberg. He is the first of nine men with migrant backgrounds killed by the NSU. January 2001 — A bomb disguised as a Christmas present explodes in an Iranian family's grocery store in the western city of Cologne, seriously injuring the owners' daughter. June 2001 — Abdurrahim Ozudogru, a Turkish tailor, is shot dead in his store in Nuremberg. Days later, Turkish grocer Suleyman Taskopru is killed in Hamburg. August 2001 — Turkish grocer Habil Kilic is killed in Munich. February 2004 — Mehmet Turgut, who runs a Turkish kebab restaurant in the northern city of Rostock, is shot dead. June 2004 — 23 people are injured, some seriously, when a bomb packed with 800 nails explodes on a busy shopping street in Cologne frequented by migrants. June 2005 — Turkish restaurant owner Ismail Yasar is shot dead in Nuremberg. Days later, Theodoros Boulgarides, who recently opened a key-cutting store in Munich, is shot dead. April 2006 — Mehmet Kubasik, who runs a kiosk in the western city of Dortmund, is killed. Two days later Halit Yozgat is shot dead in his internet cafe in the central city of Kassel. April 2007 — Police officer Michele Kiesewetter is killed in Heilbronn. Her colleague is seriously injured. Their firearms are stolen. November 2011 — After robbing a bank in the central city of Eisenach, Mundlos and Boehnhardt are found dead in a camper van in an apparent murder-suicide. Zschaepe sets fire to their hideout in the nearby town of Zwickau and mails videos featuring a Pink Panther cartoon character to the media in which the NSU claims responsibility for the killings. July 2012 — The head of Germany's domestic intelligence agency, Heinz Fromm, resigns following a public outcry over his agency's s...http://www.tampabay.com/a-brief-history-of-german-neo-nazi-group-nsu-ap_world3d1631f7210641a8829f88373565d674

German state fails completely in NSU case

Thursday, August 2, 2018

Abdulkerim Şimşek, son of Enver Şimşek who was the first victim of the NSU as he was killed in front of his flower stand in the German city of Nuremberg, is born and raised in Germany. Abdulkerim's fluent German is evidently better than his Turkish. Despite being a "well-integrated" German as he is, Abdulkerim's trust in the German justice system is in tatters."They claim that Germany is a state of law but it is nowhere close, this trial has proved me this. We were born and raised here. Our trust has long been damaged yet from now on we do not believe in the German justice system," he said. Mehmet Daimagüler, a lawyer for one of the victims, is of Turkish origin. Daimagüler, too, argues that the case was all but a judicial success."The resolution [of the case] does not end today, we have to assume that there are other accomplices and accomplices of the accomplices who are at large," he said. For some, German rule of law bore its fruits on Wednesday after a very lengthy process. For the Turkish community in Germany and Ankara, the reality is far from it. Ali Kemal Aydın, the Turkish Ambassador to Berlin, said in a pause during the trial that the verdict did not relieve the conscience of the families of the victims."This case is not closed," he vowed. From the very beginning of the NSU murders, t...https://www.dailysabah.com/feature/2018/07/13/german-state-fails-completely-in-nsu-case

Neo-Nazi gang member jailed for life in Germany after troubling trial

Thursday, August 2, 2018

After police raided an NSU depot containing weapons and explosives in December 1998, the trio went off the grid. Their first murder came two years later, on September 9th, 2000: the shooting of Nuremberg flower shop owner Enver Simsek. The two men took pictures of the dying man, lying in a pool of his own blood, and – alongside pictures of their other victims – created a ghoulish DVD slideshow that Zschäpe posted to media organisations. Apart from two killings – of a Greek man and a German police woman – all victims were migrants of Turkish origin. ‘Skilful liar’ In written testimony, Zschäpe told the court she “flipped out” when she heard of the first murder and urged the two to hand themselves in. Her defence – she had five lawyers in five years – portrayed her as a fearful victim of emotional blackmail. In a statement to court last week, she asked judges not to sentence her for crimes she “neither wanted nor did”. In sentencing her to life imprisonment, with no chance of early release, the court followed the prosecution and its portrayal of Zschäpe, who lived under eleven different aliases, as a “skilful liar”. Her refusal to testify means families of the victims still don’t know why their loved ones were selected to be killed. The legacy of the NSU trial, they say, is a pattern of institutional racism among police who classified the murders as clan crime. Abdulkerim Simsek says his flower-shop owner father, the NSU’s first murder victim, was portrayed by police as a criminal, and his family as co-conspirators or even perpetrators. “They searched our entire apartment, the newspapers said my father was a drug dealer because he went to Holland every week to buy flowers,” he said. Their lawyers believe investigators have worked to conceal the scale of the NSU supporter and sympathiser network in a bid to keep under wraps the extent of contact between the neo-Nazis and police informers. One special security agent conceded he was in an internet cafe in April 2006 when the 21-year-old owner was shot dead by the NSU. Chatting online with his mistress in the café’s back room, he claimed neither to have heard the shots nor seen the dead body. Let's block ads! a...https://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/europe/neo-nazi-gang-member-jailed-for-life-in-germany-after-troubling-trial-1.3561512

Secrets of Germany's Deadly Neo-Nazi Terror Underground

Thursday, August 2, 2018

German history. A recent trial reveals what German authorities did not want to know.Josephine Huetlin07.25.18 5:09 AM ETPhoto Illustration by The Daily BeastNUREMBERG, Germany—The year was 1999 and the man who now goes by the alias Mehmet O. was only 18, but he had just opened a new bar here and he was cleaning up on the morning after the party.In the men’s bathroom he found a flashlight that he didn’t recognize. He clicked it on. The blast flung him all the way back to the pub’s entrance, and he lay there with his ears ringing, until he passed out. Days later, when two German police officers showed up to interview him, the young man whose parents had immigrated from Turkey answered them in his rapid-fire Nuremberger accent. The two police officers told him that if the explosive had detonated properly, it would have killed him. Then they began to interrogate him about whether he’d been paying anyone “protection money.” They figured this was retaliation of some sort by local organized crime.Fifteen years later, the same two officers, now elderly, contacted Mehmet O. again. It turned out, they told him, that the flashlight bomb in his bathroom had been put there not by any mafia but by the National Socialist Underground...https://www.thedailybeast.com/secrets-of-germanys-deadly-neo-nazi-terror-underground

Antique watering can made in Aesthetic style in 19th century

Thursday, August 2, 2018

Kent County, England, in 1857. It became the Kent Police in 2002. Kent Constabulary buttons are fairly common and sell online for about $1 to $5. Q: I have eight plates marked “Thomas, Bavaria.” They are about 13 inches in diameter. I have no clue what I have. Can you help me? A: Your large plates are service plates, which are used during the first course of a formal dinner under a smaller salad plate, appetizer or soup bowl. They were made by Porcelain Factory Thomas & Co., a factory started by Fritz Thomas in Marktredwitz, Bavaria, Germany, in 1903. The company became a subsidiary of Philip Rosenthal & Co. of Selb, Bavaria, in 1908. Most production moved to Speichersdorf in 1960. Thomas porcelain still is being made. You have part of a set of 12 service plates. A full set sells for $100 to $300. Just eight are worth $100. Tip: The more elaborate the interior fittings for a desk, the more valuable the piece. On the block Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea markets, sales and auctions throughout the United States. Prices vary in different locations because of local economic conditions. Depression glass, cherry blossom, cake plate, pink, footed, Jeannette Glass Co., circa 1930, 10½ inches, $30. Doll, Madame Alexander, Sonja Henie, black dress, gold tirm on bottom and neck, ice skates, blonde hair, 1939, $120. Music box, jewelry, black forest, oak, ram, rocky ground, flowers, leaves, circa 1920, 13 by 7½ inches, $196. Copper cauldron, iron bail handle, rounded bottom, dovetailed, 1800s, 17 by 25 inches, $258. Lap desk, pine, mixed woods, reticulated brass mounts, hinged lids, ink wells, 1800s, 4 by 13 by 10 inches, $319. Fischer figurine, deer, with fawn, seated, green fishnet, white, gilt highlights, signed, 3½ by 5 inches, $393. Microscope, R & J Beck, brass, adjustable, inscribed London Hospital, Marie Celeste, circa 1900, 12 by 6 inches, $516. Vase, porcelain, blue, white, flowers, bands, birds, narrow neck, Chinese, 1¾ by 7 inches, $2,856. Sculpture, pottery, slab, black, gray, white drip, Jun Kaneko, 29 by 22 inches, $4,000. Vase, porcelain, puppy, seated, white, wavy fur, Jeff Koons, 17½ inches, $10,625. !-- div class="entry-...https://www.heraldnet.com/life/antique-watering-can-made-in-aesthetic-style-in-19th-century/

Flower vases, urns, fountains prove popular with collectors

Saturday, July 14, 2018

Q. Can you give me any information about a devil creamer? It’s red-orange and is shaped like a devil on his knees. The cream pours out of his mouth. The bottom is marked “Royal Bayreuth, Bavaria,” with a lion holding a shield with the letter “T” on it. The date 1794 is below the shield. A. Royal Bayreuth is known for its creamers, pitchers, cracker jars, bowls, salt and pepper shakers, and other items made in the shapes of fruit, tomatoes, lobsters, shells, flowers, animals, birds, clowns and more. The red devil is part of a group of pieces known as “Devil & Cards,” a group that was shaped like a devil, playing cards or both. The red devil alone was made as a 31/2-inch creamer, a 41/2-inch milk pitcher and two different ashtrays. A black devil also was made. The mark on your creamer, in blue, green or black, was used after 1900. The date on the mark is the year Royal Bayreuth was founded in Tettau, Bavaria. The company still is in business, now making dinnerware. There is a club for collectors, the Royal Bayreuth Collectors Club (RoyalBayreuth.org), which has an annual convention. A creamer like yours sold for $360 last year. <!-- OAS_AD('Middle'); //--> Q. I bought this cuff bracelet years ago at a yard sale. It’s about 2 inches wide and I don’t know what metal it is, but it has an antiqued finish. The inside has a mark for Miriam Haskell, but it doesn’t look like her typical costume jewelry. Can you help and maybe give me a value? A. The finish on your bracelet is called Russian gold. Other designers of vintage costume jewelry used similar finishes, but Miriam Haskell’s company used a secret signature Russian gold plating recipe developed just for them that resulted in patinas ranging from dull to bright. It was a type of gold plating on brass, and the plating solution is said to have 24-karat gold among the secret ingredients. Pieces were hand-dipped and then sealed. Many were further embellished with glass beads, faux seed pearls and other decoration. Haskell’s Russian gold also is found on many their filigree pieces. Asking prices for Miriam Haskell hinged bracelets like yours range from $100 to $250, but we’ve found selling prices to be less than $100. Embellished examples are worth more. Q. I have my great-grandfather’s accordion, a Pre-1900 Hohner two-row button diatonic. It was appraised and I was told it would fetch four figures. I’d love to keep it, but no one in my family wants it. It’s normal fifth scalar organization, 20 plus treble buttons and 12 bass buttons in very good condition. Where should I start? A. You probably will get the highest price by selling the accordion at an auction of other antique musical instruments. Expect to pay the auction gallery a commission, a percentage of the hammer price. Fees a...http://www.vindy.com/news/2018/jun/24/flower-vases-urns-fountains-prove-popula/

What's in a Home? - CityLab

Friday, April 13, 2018

He was astonished by Peru’s diversity, both in terms of geography and inhabitants, as he traveled around the country.Thomas Dworzak travelled around the world—Bavaria, Georgia, Iran—to capture the places he had called home: places that he says still burn within him. Of Tblisi, Georgia, in particular, Dworzak wrote in the forward to his photo set, “I force myself away for longer periods but am sure to always come back. And still, I will always remain a foreigner…I think I will never gain the same level of understanding, the language, the dialect, the humor, than whenever I return to visit my father in that place I left so desperately 30 years ago.” Dworzak photographed his father in the Bavarian village from which he was deported as a child; his wife in Tehran; his friends in Tblisi. While Dworzak also included images of location and scenery, it is clear that, for him, home is haunted by the people who inhabit it.It is impossible for “home” to be interpreted exactly the same way by different people, influenced as we are by entirely different things: the way light strikes the wall of our favorite diner, the curve of our grandmother’s cheek, the way it feels to walk the same street for years. But the book proves that there are many ways to think about a home, and even more ways to visualize it.Home is available for purchase at the Magnum shop.

Keukenhof Gardens: Discover a wealth of flowers - United States Army

Friday, April 13, 2018

Dutch growers and a wealth of flowers, sorted by color. The Keukenhof, translated to Kitchen Garden, owes its name to Countess Jacoba van Beieren (Jaqueline of Bavaria), who had a castle at this location in the 15th century. She stayed there very often, because the area provided good hunting grounds. Herbs and vegetables were grown in the yard for her kitchen and these have given way to more colorful plants and flowers. Over six million flower bulbs provide beautiful scenic spots throughout the park. Large flower palaces are filled with oceans of tulips, daffodils, hyacinths and smaller varieties of their species as well as orchids, roses, carnations, irises, lilies and many more flowers. As the season progresses, the emphasis shifts to different groups of flowers. It is a display of colors and an overwhelming perfume.Endless varieties of tulips can be seen most of the time, but the best time to view them is mid-April. Other flowers bloom again at a different time. However, the park is always a colorful sight. The flower shops in the park can actually mail flower bulbs to the U.S. for customers.The park is open only in the spring time. This year, you can visit from March 22 to May 23. The Keukenhof is open daily from 8 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Ticket office closes at 6 p.m. Entry is €16 for adults and €8 for children age 4 to 11. Keukenhof is easy to reach via the A4 (exit Nieuw-Vennep) and the A44 (exit 3 Lisse). Follow the Keukenhof s...