Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber Deutsch

Florists in Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber Germany

Send flowers and gifts online for any occasion

fresh flowers Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber
birthday flowers Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber
funeral flowers Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber
get well flowers Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber
roses Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber
lilies Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber
plants Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber
gift baskets Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber

Find Florist in Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber Germany


  • Blumen-Heller

    Bahnhofstr. 15
    91541 Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber
    Tel: 09861 918 97 07
  • Gärtnerei Müller

    Wenggasse 29-31
    91541 Rothenburg Ob Der Tauber
    Tel: 09861 939 44

Driving Germany's 'Romantic Road' - Condé Nast Traveler

Thursday, March 15, 2018

Neuschwanstein Castle. " data-type="image-embed" data-reactid="163" readability="1" View from Neuschwanstein Castle.Photo by Laura Dannen RedmanDay 2: There's a lot to do between Füssen and Rothenburg ob der Tauber ("on the Tauber river"), which is about 150 miles away as the highway flies. Take the more meandering route, about a three-hour ride (without stops) on B17 and A7, for a full Romantic Road experience. After passing a handful of villages, heading slowly around traffic circles, you'll wonder if the locals care you're here—it all seems so peaceful and quiet. Best to keep passing through until your first stop, about an hour and a half north, in Augsburg, Bavaria's oldest city (and originally a Roman town). Grab a bite outside at a cafe on the Maximilianstrasse, to take it all in, before heading to the Fuggerei, a walled Roman Catholic housing complex for the poor built in the early 1500s by Jakob Fugger. It still serves as subsidized housing to this day, and you can take a tour of one of the homes, peeking into the spartan but welcoming living room, bedroom, and kitchen. There's also a complicated history of the Fuggerei's rebirth following a WWII bombing raid, made all the more real by the mini-museum's setting in a bunker.Take a breath and get back on the road. You can swing by Harburg Castle, or choose Dinkelsbühl as your next overnight, but we decided to push on a little farther to Rothenburg. So glad we did—we could have a stayed a full weekend here. After checking in to Burg-Hotel—another impossibly pretty place in a monastery garden, with views upstairs of the Tauber Valley—we happened upon the free sundown walking tour of the town, getting started in the market square. It took us to the outer wall, and along backroads where restaurants were just starting to turn their lights on. The Alt-Rothenburger Handwerkerhaus is a fun detour to see a 700-year-old house and the remains of artisans' workshops—coopers, weavers, cobblers and potters. It all looks like a film set or a Disney theme park—but then again, film sets and theme parks are made to look like this.Day 3: After lingering in Rothenburg for a late breakfast, drive out for the last, hour-and-change stretch to Würzburg outside Frankfurt, where the wine impresses as much as the city's focal point—the Residenz, an 18th-century Baroque palace. A meal of asparagus, filet mignon, and lots (and lots!) of local riesling at Bürgerspital restaurant caps off a drive that actually lives up to its billing.

Christmas markets a deeply rooted tradition in Germany - Deutsche Welle

Thursday, December 22, 2016

DW. Many Christmas markets in Germany do that by drawing on the centuries-old tradition, such as those in Rothenburg ob der Tauber, a largely preserved medieval town in Bavaria, and in Quedlinburg, a UNESCO-listed city known for its some 2,000 timber-framed houses. Nearly every town and village hosts a market each year, and in larger cities, markets can be found in every district. Some take a more modern twist, catering to the LGBTQ crowd or offering vegan specialties, for example. As the capital, Berlin is home to some 80 Christmas market each year. Every tourist is likely to pass through the Alexanderplatz square in downtown Berlin, where the "Winter Dream" market takes place. Those hoping to escape the big city hustle and bustle make their way to the Lucia Christmas market in the courtyards of the Kulturbrauerei in Berlin's Prenzlauer Berg district. Named after Lucia, the Nordic goddess of light, the market is dedicated to Scandinavian countries. Meanwhile, the Gendarmenmarkt typically features places to wine and dine as well as enjoy the stage show. On Tuesday, out of respects for the victims of Monday's attack and their families, all of Berlin's Christmas markets were encour...http://www.dw.com/en/christmas-markets-a-deeply-rooted-tradition-in-germany/a-36844766

Travel: Germany's answer to Vancouver and Whistler is worth the trip - BCBusiness

Saturday, December 8, 2018

But B.C.s favourite winter wonderland lacks the old-timey charm of Berchtesgaden. And while some aspects of the Bavarian retreats history are undoubtedly regrettable (thanks to historical museum Dokumentation Obersalzberg and its 170,000 visitors in 2017, the village doesnt shy away from its past), others have aged well. A trip across a lake named K.nigssee, for example, yields the Church of St. Bartholom., built in the 12th century, plus a family-run food stand specializing in smoked trout on a bun. (Just dont ask for WiFi.) The right to fish in the lake is passed down from generation to generation, with only one person holding the right to catch at any given time. Not a bad business model. Speaking of which, two other notable commercial endeavours in the region that have stood the test of time are lederhosen clothier Engelbert Aigner and the Grassl distillery, which specializes in schnapps. The former is another family business, though instead of monopolizing Germanys waterways, it makes artisanal lederhosen. This isnt the stuff you can find in every tourist shop in Germany for $200 a pop, either. Its the real, custom, hand-stitched item that will put you on a year-long waitlist. Apparently, the leather is a good choice in the mercurial Bavarian climate and isnt only worn during Oktoberfest. (Though if you dont sport a pair in Germany then, youre not even a tourist; youre like an alien or something.) The latter is Germanys oldest distillery, open since 1692. Grassl doesnt use any aromas or perfumes for its schnapps, either; theyre all-natural, to the point that many of the shops specialty products are still made up in the mountain ranges and barrel-aged for three years. Berchtesgaden has also cornered the market on a certain Olympic sport with a massive luge/bobsled track that German athletes flock to in all seasons. It seems like a perfect little paradise, but as with all such places, our time here is too short. Keep Munich weirdAfter another bus ride through the mountains, we arrive in the capital of the state of Bavaria. Spotless Munich is one of the richest areas of Europe, but there are some eccentricities amid the beautiful buildings that shape the city centre. Perhaps chief among them is the Rathaus-Glockenspiel, basically a huge merry-go round, atta...https://www.bcbusiness.ca/Travel-Germanys-answer-to-Vancouver-and-Whistler-is-worth-the-trip

Bavaria election: German conservatives lose their fizz - BBC News

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Every autumn, lederhosen-clad drinkers crowd into vast tents festooned with dried hop flowers, to celebrate Bavaria's most intoxicating export. Waitresses bearing fistfuls of beer glasses squeeze between packed wooden benches. It's hard to make much out above the brass band music but, listen closely this year, and the talk is of politics. Just like Oktoberfest, Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative sister party is woven into the checked fabric of Bavarian culture. The Christian Social Union (CSU) has ruled Germany's richest state since 1957, sharing power just once in a coalition with the free-market FDP. And since then, every Bavarian prime minister has risen from its ranks. But now, swift as a reveller draining his tankard, support has ebbed away. The CSU is bracing itself for humiliating losses in today's Bavarian state election. The party is on course to lose the absolute majority its leaders once took for granted. This is likely to be an historic election which will define Bavaria's very identity, encapsulated in the word "Heimat" (homeland). "In this...https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-45835795

Germany’s new Green divide - POLITICO.eu

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Germanys Social Democrats would do well to look at the neighborhood of Haidhausen in central Munich. For centuries, the area was known as the poorhouse of the Bavarian capital; after post-war reconstruction, it became a dilapidated workers quarter, described as a district of broken glass for its rundown condition. About half of all apartments had no bathroom and no hot water, the magazine Der Spiegel wrote in 1980. Even fewer had access to central heating. Over the past few decades, however, the neighborhood has flourished thanks in no small part to a large-scale redevelopment plan initiated by the SPD-led city government in the early 1970s. Gentrification has taken hold. Residents are younger and rents are higher than the Munich average. Trendy cafes, expensive bicycles and organic shops cluster around the districts picturesque squares. Given Haidhausens history, its no surprise that the Social Democrats were the dominant party in this area for decades at least until recently. In Bavarias state election in October, the SPD suffered a colossal defeat in the Munich-Mitte constituency to which Haidhausen belongs, its vote share shrinking by t...https://www.politico.eu/article/germany-green-party-haidhausen-munich-elections-social-democrats-spd-is-the-new-red/

Bavaria election: German conservatives lose their fizz

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Every autumn, lederhosen-clad drinkers crowd into vast tents festooned with dried hop flowers, to celebrate Bavaria's most intoxicating export. Waitresses bearing fistfuls of beer glasses squeeze between packed wooden benches. It's hard to make much out above the brass band music but, listen closely this year, and the talk is of politics. Just like Oktoberfest, Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative sister party is woven into the checked fabric of Bavarian culture. The Christian Social Union (CSU) has ruled Germany's richest state since 1957, sharing power just once in a coalition with the free-market FDP. And since then, every Bavarian prime minister has risen from its ranks. But now, swift as a reveller draining his tankard, support has ebbed away. The CSU is bracing itself for humiliating losses in today's Bavarian state election. The party is on course to lose the absolute majority its leaders once took for granted. This is likely to be an historic election which will define Bavaria's very identity, encapsulated in the word "Heimat" (homeland). "In this...https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-45835795