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Honored Dead Marching Onward In Our Memories

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Army Air Corps. They should have flown by, but in the legion of the forgotten dead, all must walk in ghostly procession in their final encampment. Other place names recognized: Ploesti, Schweinfurt, Regensburg. Red walks by, an apparition. Who now recalls a tiny Italian town named Roverto up there in the Brenner Pass, or remembers a boy named Red crouched in the waist of a B-25? What ghastly remembrance of things past is this which intrudes on a happy, carefree holiday, with picnics and ball games? Why think now about Red with body crumpled and his head sliced off from a burst of flak from a German 88 far below? Red’s mother put a little gold star in the front window of her home, a little Pennsylvania town, and on Memorial Day the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars put a flag and flowers on his grave. Is this remembrance? Red marches on with the legion, the legion of the forgotten dead. With him in awesome numbers are the sailors from Pearl Harbor and Okinawa and all the vast expanse of the seas where death came so swiftly; with him the GIs whose blood made the cold gray ocean on the beach called Omaha dull, rusty red; who fell in Italy and France and Germany and nameless islands in the Pacific. They trudge along so quietly now; the Marines who died on the sands of Iwo Jima and in the caves on Okinawa. There are many of them, so very, very, many … see them march by. Finally they pass. No such euphemism as going West for these. Their comrades said simply: They got it. Red got it. All these got it. They are the legion of the forgotten dead. They are the reason the Stars and Stripes flies instead of a Nazi emblem or the Rising Sun over the Capitol. Here come others along. The numbers of the silent marchers are fewer now. There’s a group of Marines dragging sleds loaded with comrades, frozen, grotesque caricatures of men lashed in layers. They fell in Korea at a place called Chosin Reservoir, and the Marines vowed to fight their way out and take their dead with them. They did, and now they pull those sleds along in the ranks of the forgotten legion forever. There are GIs in the group from Pork Chop Hill and Pusan; those whose families received the ominous telegrams with the introduction: The War Department regrets to inform you … On they march. They’re almost past, now. This last group of marchers is looking off to one side, as if they’re unsure of their reception. Hear the whispers from the Navy pilots and Marines and GIs of Vietnam. They’re by, now, finally, all of them. And the legion of the forgotten dead has disappeared once more, shrouded in the mist of antiquity. The backbone of every American should stiffen in salute this day to the legion of the war dead of our country; that forgotten army whose sacrifices mean that we live in freedom. Is it too much to ask to remember them, honor them, on this one day, this legion of the forgotten dead, who have died for America and thus for you and me? March on, brave legions. For some remember, and solemnly resolve: Your march for freedom has not been in vain. Adam Kelly (1924-1990) wrote The Country Editor column for The Intelligencer. -- ...http://www.theintelligencer.net/opinion/local-columns/2018/05/honored-dead-marching-onward-in-our-memories/

Weld County Tributes for July 18 - Greeley Tribune

Friday, August 11, 2017

The two were married on Feb. 15, 1954, just prior to Lee's deployment to post-war Germany, where Charlotte soon joined him. They made their first homes in Schweinfurt, Brüchenau, and Wildflecken, Germany. They welcomed their first child, Lee Kurt Holder, in August 1955 in Würzburg.With their son only 6 weeks old, they returned to the United States and lived in the San Francisco Bay area. Moving as required by Lee's career, they lived in El Cerrito and later Hayward, at which time their daughter Liese was born in the Oakland hospital. Their middle child, Lawrence (Larry) was born in Salinas, Calif., not far from Monterey. Lon was born in Laramie, Wyo., following a move from Cheyenne. Wyoming remained Charlotte's favorite state throughout the years. While living in Potomac, Md., their youngest daughter, Laurie, was born in Washington D.C. within sight of the White House. The family went on to live in Ann Arbor, Mich., Chapel Hill, N.C., Memphis, Tenn., and Oklahoma City and Yukon, Okla., before finally relocating to Windsor in 2015.Charlotte received her bachelor's degree in German from Memphis State University at age 49. She also studied Hebrew, which was closely tied to her personal Bible studies and her love for the holy land of Israel, and tutored several of her grandchildren in the language.An accomplished pianist, Charlotte taught all of her children to play piano and to appreciate music all their lives. She loved to listen to her children and grandchildren making music. On the baby grand piano that she and Lee purchased early in their marriage, she would often play songs from The Sound of Music, while the family sang along.Following her salvation as a young child, Charlotte put faith in God first all her life. She also very much appreciated the "Jewish Roots" of her faith. Her main goal in life was to finish the work that God had set out for her to do, reminiscent of her mother's life verse from Philippians 1:6, "And I am sure that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ."She had a call to missions, which initially led to nursing school, and which later found its fruition as she devoted her life to raising her many ch...http://www.greeleytribune.com/news/obituaries/tributes-for-july-18-8/

Murder tests how far German media have come in reporting refugee crime - Christian Science Monitor

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Christian Science MonitorMurder tests how far German media have come in reporting refugee crimeChristian Science MonitorLutz Frühbrodt, a journalism professor at Würzburg-Schweinfurt University, says he disagrees with the German press code that forbids journalists from reporting the national origin of perpetrators, because it leaves media consumers to play a guessing game.and more »...http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Europe/2016/1212/Murder-tests-how-far-German-media-have-come-in-reporting-refugee-crime

Bavaria election: German conservatives lose their fizz

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Every autumn, lederhosen-clad drinkers crowd into vast tents festooned with dried hop flowers, to celebrate Bavaria's most intoxicating export. Waitresses bearing fistfuls of beer glasses squeeze between packed wooden benches. It's hard to make much out above the brass band music but, listen closely this year, and the talk is of politics. Just like Oktoberfest, Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative sister party is woven into the checked fabric of Bavarian culture. The Christian Social Union (CSU) has ruled Germany's richest state since 1957, sharing power just once in a coalition with the free-market FDP. And since then, every Bavarian prime minister has risen from its ranks. But now, swift as a reveller draining his tankard, support has ebbed away. The CSU is bracing itself for humiliating losses in today's Bavarian state election. The party is on course to lose the absolute majority its leaders once took for granted. This is likely to be an historic election which will define Bavaria's very identity, encapsulated in the word "Heimat" (homeland). "In this...https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-45835795

Bavarian Election Exit Poll: Merkel Allies See Huge Losses As Greens and Populists Surge

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

The Christian Social Union (CSU) is projected to win the Bavarian election but the allies of German Chancellor Angela Merkel has seen huge losses in support while the Green Party has surged. An exit poll released by Infratest dimap shows the centre-right CSU as the winner of the election with 35.5 percent of the vote, which constitutes a massive 12.2 percent loss compared to the previous Bavarian election in 2013. The biggest winner of the race has been the Green Party, who look to have doubled their support compared to 2013 as the left-liberal Social Democrats (SPD) saw a total collapse, losing over 10 percent of their previous support. Germany (Bavarian state election), Infratest dimap exit poll: CSU-EPP: 35.5%GRÜNE-G/EFA: 18.5%FW-ALDE: 11.5%AfD-EFDD: 11%SPD-S&D: 10%FDP-ALDE: 5%LINKE-LEFT: 3.5%#ltwbayern #ltwby #ltwby18 #bayern #landtagswahl — Europe Elects (@EuropeElects) October 14, 2018 The populist, anti-mass migration Alternative for Germany (AfD), who are competing in the Bavarian regional elections for the first t...https://www.breitbart.com/europe/2018/10/14/bavarian-election-exit-poll-merkel-allies-see-huge-losses-as-greens-and-populists-surge/

Germany's Greens flourish while mainstream rivals flounder

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Greens have become a magnet for liberal-minded voters in the past year. The party appears poised for an unprecedented second-place finish in traditionally conservative Bavaria's state election on Sunday. It is polling strongly ahead in the election scheduled in neighboring Hesse two weeks later. The Greens have clear policies on central issues, including an emphasis on fighting climate change and a largely liberal approach to migration. The party also has a pragmatic approach and become a partner to parties from the center-right to the hard left in nine of Germany's 16 state governments. Nationally, some recent polls have shown them level with the Social Democrats, traditionally Germany's main center-left party. FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2018 file photo the new party leaders Robert Habeck, right, and Annalena Baerbock make their way on stage at the party convention of the Green party in Hannover, northern Germany. While other German mainstream parties flounder in polls and struggle to find an answer to a far-right challenge, the Greens have gone from strength to strength over the last year. (Bernd von Jutrczenka/dpa via AP) FILE - In this Aug. 27, 2018 file photo bucket wheels dig for coal near the Hambach Forest near Dueren, Germany. While other German mainstream parties flounder in polls and str...https://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/ap/article-6268489/Germanys-Greens-flourish-mainstream-rivals-flounder.html

Europe: Going with the flow on the Danube and the Rhine

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Bamberg.Nearby Nuremberg's name is written in its World War II and the post-war story; an unparalleled opportunity for visitors interested in all-too modern history. This is Bavaria and they brew beer, bake (more) pretzels and serve sausages. The specialities should be on the menu at Regensburg, which boasts Germany's oldest sausage kitchen, where one can find the best wurst. Passau is "the last city in Germany", where three rivers meet, and its baroque style is worth visiting in its own right. Many passers-through, however, will head for nearby Salzburg, home of Mozart, location for The Sound of Music, and the temptations of its chocolatiers. Another option — especially for those who want to add another country into their passports — is Cesky Krumlov, a tiny World Heritage city with a huge castle across the border in the Czech Republic. Back on the boat, the voyage continues along scenic stretches of the Danube to Linz, then Melk and its famous abbey. For many guests, a highlight is cycling to Durnstein, about 40km, through vineyards and flowers, charming villages and ruined castles. Now, three capital cities in three days — each with its unique history and its distinctive present — the starched grandeur of Vienna (Austria), quirky impudence of Bratislava (Slovakia), poignant glamour of Budapest (Hungary). To farewell Europe feeling like royalty, travellers can ride the Grand Empress steam train, evoking memories of the beautiful and tragic Elisabeth, 19th century Empress of Austria. Boarding at Budapest Station's royal waiting room, the short journey, in carriages from the early 1900s, treats guests to a traditional game lunch and a tour of the monarch's summer residence, Godollo Palace. Three rivers, six countries, more than 20 centuries of history, art, culture, food and wine, tours and activities: it sounds like a lot to cram into two weeks. But when you go with the relaxed flow of a European river cruise, time seems to go past slowly — if not stand still. https://www.nzherald.co.nz/travel/news/article.cfm?c_id=7&objectid=12132000