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Honored Dead Marching Onward In Our Memories

Thursday, June 21, 2018

Army Air Corps. They should have flown by, but in the legion of the forgotten dead, all must walk in ghostly procession in their final encampment. Other place names recognized: Ploesti, Schweinfurt, Regensburg. Red walks by, an apparition. Who now recalls a tiny Italian town named Roverto up there in the Brenner Pass, or remembers a boy named Red crouched in the waist of a B-25? What ghastly remembrance of things past is this which intrudes on a happy, carefree holiday, with picnics and ball games? Why think now about Red with body crumpled and his head sliced off from a burst of flak from a German 88 far below? Red’s mother put a little gold star in the front window of her home, a little Pennsylvania town, and on Memorial Day the American Legion and Veterans of Foreign Wars put a flag and flowers on his grave. Is this remembrance? Red marches on with the legion, the legion of the forgotten dead. With him in awesome numbers are the sailors from Pearl Harbor and Okinawa and all the vast expanse of the seas where death came so swiftly; with him the GIs whose blood made the cold gray ocean on the beach called Omaha dull, rusty red; who fell in Italy and France and Germany and nameless islands in the Pacific. They trudge along so quietly now; the Marines who died on the sands of Iwo Jima and in the caves on Okinawa. There are many of them, so very, very, many … see them march by. Finally they pass. No such euphemism as going West for these. Their comrades said simply: They got it. Red got it. All these got it. They are the legion of the forgotten dead. They are the reason the Stars and Stripes flies instead of a Nazi emblem or the Rising Sun over the Capitol. Here come others along. The numbers of the silent marchers are fewer now. There’s a group of Marines dragging sleds loaded with comrades, frozen, grotesque caricatures of men lashed in layers. They fell in Korea at a place called Chosin Reservoir, and the Marines vowed to fight their way out and take their dead with them. They did, and now they pull those sleds along in the ranks of the forgotten legion forever. There are GIs in the group from Pork Chop Hill and Pusan; those whose families received the ominous telegrams with the introduction: The War Department regrets to inform you … On they march. They’re almost past, now. This last group of marchers is looking off to one side, as if they’re unsure of their reception. Hear the whispers from the Navy pilots and Marines and GIs of Vietnam. They’re by, now, finally, all of them. And the legion of the forgotten dead has disappeared once more, shrouded in the mist of antiquity. The backbone of every American should stiffen in salute this day to the legion of the war dead of our country; that forgotten army whose sacrifices mean that we live in freedom. Is it too much to ask to remember them, honor them, on this one day, this legion of the forgotten dead, who have died for America and thus for you and me? March on, brave legions. For some remember, and solemnly resolve: Your march for freedom has not been in vain. Adam Kelly (1924-1990) wrote The Country Editor column for The Intelligencer. -- ...http://www.theintelligencer.net/opinion/local-columns/2018/05/honored-dead-marching-onward-in-our-memories/

Weld County Tributes for July 18 - Greeley Tribune

Friday, August 11, 2017

The two were married on Feb. 15, 1954, just prior to Lee's deployment to post-war Germany, where Charlotte soon joined him. They made their first homes in Schweinfurt, Brüchenau, and Wildflecken, Germany. They welcomed their first child, Lee Kurt Holder, in August 1955 in Würzburg.With their son only 6 weeks old, they returned to the United States and lived in the San Francisco Bay area. Moving as required by Lee's career, they lived in El Cerrito and later Hayward, at which time their daughter Liese was born in the Oakland hospital. Their middle child, Lawrence (Larry) was born in Salinas, Calif., not far from Monterey. Lon was born in Laramie, Wyo., following a move from Cheyenne. Wyoming remained Charlotte's favorite state throughout the years. While living in Potomac, Md., their youngest daughter, Laurie, was born in Washington D.C. within sight of the White House. The family went on to live in Ann Arbor, Mich., Chapel Hill, N.C., Memphis, Tenn., and Oklahoma City and Yukon, Okla., before finally relocating to Windsor in 2015.Charlotte received her bachelor's degree in German from Memphis State University at age 49. She also studied Hebrew, which was closely tied to her personal Bible studies and her love for the holy land of Israel, and tutored several of her grandchildren in the language.An accomplished pianist, Charlotte taught all of her children to play piano and to appreciate music all their lives. She loved to listen to her children and grandchildren making music. On the baby grand piano that she and Lee purchased early in their marriage, she would often play songs from The Sound of Music, while the family sang along.Following her salvation as a young child, Charlotte put faith in God first all her life. She also very much appreciated the "Jewish Roots" of her faith. Her main goal in life was to finish the work that God had set out for her to do, reminiscent of her mother's life verse from Philippians 1:6, "And I am sure that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ."She had a call to missions, which initially led to nursing school, and which later found its fruition as she devoted her life to raising her many ch...http://www.greeleytribune.com/news/obituaries/tributes-for-july-18-8/

Murder tests how far German media have come in reporting refugee crime - Christian Science Monitor

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Christian Science MonitorMurder tests how far German media have come in reporting refugee crimeChristian Science MonitorLutz Frühbrodt, a journalism professor at Würzburg-Schweinfurt University, says he disagrees with the German press code that forbids journalists from reporting the national origin of perpetrators, because it leaves media consumers to play a guessing game.and more »...http://www.csmonitor.com/World/Europe/2016/1212/Murder-tests-how-far-German-media-have-come-in-reporting-refugee-crime

Germany’s new Green divide - POLITICO.eu

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Germanys Social Democrats would do well to look at the neighborhood of Haidhausen in central Munich. For centuries, the area was known as the poorhouse of the Bavarian capital; after post-war reconstruction, it became a dilapidated workers quarter, described as a district of broken glass for its rundown condition. About half of all apartments had no bathroom and no hot water, the magazine Der Spiegel wrote in 1980. Even fewer had access to central heating. Over the past few decades, however, the neighborhood has flourished thanks in no small part to a large-scale redevelopment plan initiated by the SPD-led city government in the early 1970s. Gentrification has taken hold. Residents are younger and rents are higher than the Munich average. Trendy cafes, expensive bicycles and organic shops cluster around the districts picturesque squares. Given Haidhausens history, its no surprise that the Social Democrats were the dominant party in this area for decades at least until recently. In Bavarias state election in October, the SPD suffered a colossal defeat in the Munich-Mitte constituency to which Haidhausen belongs, its vote share shrinking by t...https://www.politico.eu/article/germany-green-party-haidhausen-munich-elections-social-democrats-spd-is-the-new-red/

Bavaria election: German conservatives lose their fizz - BBC News

Saturday, December 8, 2018

Every autumn, lederhosen-clad drinkers crowd into vast tents festooned with dried hop flowers, to celebrate Bavaria's most intoxicating export. Waitresses bearing fistfuls of beer glasses squeeze between packed wooden benches. It's hard to make much out above the brass band music but, listen closely this year, and the talk is of politics. Just like Oktoberfest, Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative sister party is woven into the checked fabric of Bavarian culture. The Christian Social Union (CSU) has ruled Germany's richest state since 1957, sharing power just once in a coalition with the free-market FDP. And since then, every Bavarian prime minister has risen from its ranks. But now, swift as a reveller draining his tankard, support has ebbed away. The CSU is bracing itself for humiliating losses in today's Bavarian state election. The party is on course to lose the absolute majority its leaders once took for granted. This is likely to be an historic election which will define Bavaria's very identity, encapsulated in the word "Heimat" (homeland). "In this...https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-45835795

Travel: Germany's answer to Vancouver and Whistler is worth the trip - BCBusiness

Saturday, December 8, 2018

But B.C.s favourite winter wonderland lacks the old-timey charm of Berchtesgaden. And while some aspects of the Bavarian retreats history are undoubtedly regrettable (thanks to historical museum Dokumentation Obersalzberg and its 170,000 visitors in 2017, the village doesnt shy away from its past), others have aged well. A trip across a lake named K.nigssee, for example, yields the Church of St. Bartholom., built in the 12th century, plus a family-run food stand specializing in smoked trout on a bun. (Just dont ask for WiFi.) The right to fish in the lake is passed down from generation to generation, with only one person holding the right to catch at any given time. Not a bad business model. Speaking of which, two other notable commercial endeavours in the region that have stood the test of time are lederhosen clothier Engelbert Aigner and the Grassl distillery, which specializes in schnapps. The former is another family business, though instead of monopolizing Germanys waterways, it makes artisanal lederhosen. This isnt the stuff you can find in every tourist shop in Germany for $200 a pop, either. Its the real, custom, hand-stitched item that will put you on a year-long waitlist. Apparently, the leather is a good choice in the mercurial Bavarian climate and isnt only worn during Oktoberfest. (Though if you dont sport a pair in Germany then, youre not even a tourist; youre like an alien or something.) The latter is Germanys oldest distillery, open since 1692. Grassl doesnt use any aromas or perfumes for its schnapps, either; theyre all-natural, to the point that many of the shops specialty products are still made up in the mountain ranges and barrel-aged for three years. Berchtesgaden has also cornered the market on a certain Olympic sport with a massive luge/bobsled track that German athletes flock to in all seasons. It seems like a perfect little paradise, but as with all such places, our time here is too short. Keep Munich weirdAfter another bus ride through the mountains, we arrive in the capital of the state of Bavaria. Spotless Munich is one of the richest areas of Europe, but there are some eccentricities amid the beautiful buildings that shape the city centre. Perhaps chief among them is the Rathaus-Glockenspiel, basically a huge merry-go round, atta...https://www.bcbusiness.ca/Travel-Germanys-answer-to-Vancouver-and-Whistler-is-worth-the-trip

Bavaria election: German conservatives lose their fizz

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

Every autumn, lederhosen-clad drinkers crowd into vast tents festooned with dried hop flowers, to celebrate Bavaria's most intoxicating export. Waitresses bearing fistfuls of beer glasses squeeze between packed wooden benches. It's hard to make much out above the brass band music but, listen closely this year, and the talk is of politics. Just like Oktoberfest, Chancellor Angela Merkel's conservative sister party is woven into the checked fabric of Bavarian culture. The Christian Social Union (CSU) has ruled Germany's richest state since 1957, sharing power just once in a coalition with the free-market FDP. And since then, every Bavarian prime minister has risen from its ranks. But now, swift as a reveller draining his tankard, support has ebbed away. The CSU is bracing itself for humiliating losses in today's Bavarian state election. The party is on course to lose the absolute majority its leaders once took for granted. This is likely to be an historic election which will define Bavaria's very identity, encapsulated in the word "Heimat" (homeland). "In this...https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-45835795