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Weld County Tributes for July 18 - Greeley Tribune

Friday, August 11, 2017

The two were married on Feb. 15, 1954, just prior to Lee's deployment to post-war Germany, where Charlotte soon joined him. They made their first homes in Schweinfurt, Brüchenau, and Wildflecken, Germany. They welcomed their first child, Lee Kurt Holder, in August 1955 in Würzburg.With their son only 6 weeks old, they returned to the United States and lived in the San Francisco Bay area. Moving as required by Lee's career, they lived in El Cerrito and later Hayward, at which time their daughter Liese was born in the Oakland hospital. Their middle child, Lawrence (Larry) was born in Salinas, Calif., not far from Monterey. Lon was born in Laramie, Wyo., following a move from Cheyenne. Wyoming remained Charlotte's favorite state throughout the years. While living in Potomac, Md., their youngest daughter, Laurie, was born in Washington D.C. within sight of the White House. The family went on to live in Ann Arbor, Mich., Chapel Hill, N.C., Memphis, Tenn., and Oklahoma City and Yukon, Okla., before finally relocating to Windsor in 2015.Charlotte received her bachelor's degree in German from Memphis State University at age 49. She also studied Hebrew, which was closely tied to her personal Bible studies and her love for the holy land of Israel, and tutored several of her grandchildren in the language.An accomplished pianist, Charlotte taught all of her children to play piano and to appreciate music all their lives. She loved to listen to her children and grandchildren making music. On the baby grand piano that she and Lee purchased early in their marriage, she would often play songs from The Sound of Music, while the family sang along.Following her salvation as a young child, Charlotte put faith in God first all her life. She also very much appreciated the "Jewish Roots" of her faith. Her main goal in life was to finish the work that God had set out for her to do, reminiscent of her mother's life verse from Philippians 1:6, "And I am sure that he who began a good work in you will bring it to completion at the day of Jesus Christ."She had a call to missions, which initially led to nursing school, and which later found its fruition as she devoted her life to raising her many ch...http://www.greeleytribune.com/news/obituaries/tributes-for-july-18-8/

The Dandelion Windfall - Canada Free Press

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

Guess what: it could turn into a real windfall for you!Dandelion ButterAs you may not know yet, I grew up in the “Land of Happy Cows” (LOHCs), i.e. the western part of southern Bavaria. In spring, the meadows there are a solid yellow with flowering dandelion plants. They are so abundant that the butter and cheese produced from the cows grazing in those fields develop a decidedly yellow color, caused by the chemical known as “beta-carotene.” It’s related to the orange color-producing substance in carrots, hence its name.Believe me, after a long winter of having to live on hay from last year’s harvests, when the season turns to spring and the dandelions are blooming, the cows are really happy then. They take to the solidly dandelion-yellow meadows in force and produce plenty of milk that is the source of the then (once again) yellow butter.For decades, the European Union countries, collectively produced a “butter mountain,” meaning a large excess that could not be consumed there. But this could change soon, when butter turns to rubber (don’t take it literally).But first to Traditional RubberAs you may know, upon injury of the leaves or bark, a variety of plants exude a viscous milky white liquid that tends to polymerize on contact with air into a rubbery blob. Of course, that’s the way much of the world’s natural rubber came into existence and is still an important agricultural product to this day. The plant that has been the source of much of the world’s “latex” that, upon exposure to air, turns into raw rubber, known as kautchuk, or caoutchouc, or India rubber, is the “rubber tree” (Hevea brasiliensis, Euphorbiaceae).Native to South America, the rubber tree was introduced to South and South-East Asia well over one-hundred years ago and that region now produces much of the world’s raw rubber.Now, to Synthetic RubberIn WWII, when the demand for rubber products increased sharply and (Germany’s) access to the natural product became limited, chemists developed the synthetic rubber, then known as Buna rubber. Its basic constituent is the small molecule isoprene that can be polymerized into rubber of excellent properties. In fact, much of today’s car tires and many other rubber products rely on that synthetic material, both for c...https://canadafreepress.com/article/the-dandelion-windfall

How Can Nazis Be on the March in Germany? - Truthout

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

We will come to power and then we will do what is necessary so that we can live a free life in the future. We tell the Bosporus that the three big Ms — Mohammed, Muezzin and Minerett — are over.” In Bavaria, the AfD is campaigning for “Islam-free schools.” But Islamophobia isn’t isolated to the AfD. The CSU’s Horst Seehöfer stated in February that “Islam does not belong in Germany.” Meanwhile, Thilo Sarrazin, a well-known leader of the Social Democratic Party (SPD), is on a book tour for his Hostile Takeover: How Islam Impairs Progress and Threatens Society. Other Islamophobic initiatives range from Chancellor Merkel’s support for banning the burka to local court battles over religious symbols in schools. A Berlin court upheld the decision to remove a public school teacher for wearing her hijab to school. Now, “feminist” groups want to a href="https://www.welt.de/politik/...https://truthout.org/articles/how-can-nazis-be-on-the-march-in-germany/

A German village goes it alone on climate protection - DW (English)

Tuesday, April 23, 2019

The local grocery store in Grafenaschau looks like most other buildings in the tiny Bavarian village. It has a large pitched roof with broad eaves and is half timber, half stone. The style is as typical as lederhosen, wheat beer and white sausage in this particular part of Germany. "It's Alpine but not 'yodel style.' We didn't want it to be really over-the-top Bavarian," jokes Hubert Mangold, as he heartily greets people on his way into the store. He's diplomatically referring to kitschier houses with brightly painted shutters, where everything's just a bit too much. But it's not just the style of the building that reflects the strong sense of custom and regional identity in the southern German state of Bavaria. Most of the products on offer are from nearby and are produced organically using traditional methods. Dressed casually in denim shorts and a plaid shirt, Mangold, who is the local mayor, points out locally sourced "hay-milk," schnapps and liquor from a nearby distillery, regional, in-season fruit and vegetables, and "in demand" traditionally milled f...https://www.dw.com/en/a-german-village-goes-it-alone-on-climate-protection/a-48030126

2 dead, more than a dozen injured after trains collide in Germany - New York Post

Sunday, March 3, 2019

Aichach. He said the driver of the cargo train was uninjured. Authorities are investigating the cause of the crash. In a separate incident in Bavaria, two people were killed Monday when a train hit their car at a crossing near Lake Starnberg. Share this: ...https://nypost.com/2018/05/08/2-dead-more-than-a-dozen-injured-after-trains-collide-in-germany/