Bremen Blumen Deutsch

Bremen Flower Shops

Select a Bremen, Germany city to view local florist address, phone number and other information. Bremen florists deliver to homes, businesses, hospitals, funeral homes and churches. Most florists offer expedited delivery in Bremen.

fresh flowers
birthday flowers
funeral flowers
get well flowers
roses
lilies
plants
gift baskets

Local florist in Bremen by City

She thought flowers were a waste of money. Until selling them brought in millions - CNN

Saturday, December 8, 2018

I had an idea notebook in my bag and had about 200 ideas at any given moment."The company's name was inspired by her experience growing up on a farm in Bremen, Indiana, a small town of 3,600. There, she never imagined running her own company. My parents worked for people. Everybody I saw worked for people," she says. "When you don't see it, you don't go for it. You can't think of that as an opportunity for yourself."It wasn't until she moved to San Francisco and became immersed in its culture that she began believing she could become an entrepreneur."I kind of joke that in San Francisco, everybody has a business plan in their back pocket. It was contagious, that entrepreneurial spirit," she says. "It was the first time in my life that I thought, 'Whoa, I could start a business.'"But as a first-time entrepreneur and a woman, she realized the deck was stacked against her. To date, Stembel has not been able to raise any outside funding. "I'm a female founder. I have a less than 2% chance of raising capital, statistically speaking," says Stembel. "I've tried several times thus far and have not been successful. I didn't graduate college. I didn't work at one of the big tech giants. I didn't have the connections."Instead, the operation remains self-funded. Farmgirl was launched eight years ago with $49,000 of Stembel's own savings. This year, it's expected to log about $23 million in annual revenue and it's turning a profit, she says. Still, Stembel is vigilant about keeping costs under control. The business relies on social media mostly Facebook and Instagram for 90% of its marketing efforts. Another cost-saving measure: "We opt to use empty coffee bags from local roasters [and] cut them down to size for wrapping. We love the look it gives the arrangements and it is compostable on the customer's end.""We are reinvesting all of our profit into our growth and bootstrapping," she says. "I'm really proud of that now."One area where she doesn't skimp is hiring. Stembel says she hires only full-time employees and offers a 401(k) plan. The startup currently employs 100 people.div class="zn-body__p...https://www.cnn.com/2018/11/19/success/farmgirl-flowers-fresh-money/index.html

How one woman is disrupting the flower business - WTHITV.com

Saturday, December 8, 2018

The company's name was inspired by her experience growing up on a farm in Bremen, Indiana, a small town of 3,600. There, she never imagined running her own company. My parents worked for people. Everybody I saw worked for people," she says. "When you don't see it, you don't go for it. You can't think of that as an opportunity for yourself." It wasn't until she moved to San Francisco and became immersed in its culture that she began believing she could become an entrepreneur. "I kind of joke that in San Francisco, everybody has a business plan in their back pocket. It was contagious, that entrepreneurial spirit," she says. "It was the first time in my life that I thought, 'Whoa, I could start a business.'" But as a first-time entrepreneur and a woman, she realized the deck was stacked against her. To date, Stembel has not been able to raise any outside funding. "I'm a female founder. I have a less than 2% chance of raising capital, statistically speaking," says Stembel. "I've tried several times thus far and have not been successful. I didn't graduate college. I didn't work at one of the big tech giants. I didn't have the connections." Instead, the operation remains self-funded. Farmgirl was launched eight years ago with $49,000 of Stembel's own savings. This year, it's expected to log about $23 million in annual revenue and it's turning a profit, she says. Still, Stembel is vigilant about keeping costs under control. The business relies on social media mostly Facebook and Instagram for 90% of its marketing efforts. Another cost-saving measure: "We opt to use empty coffee bags from local roasters [and] cut them down to size for wrapping. We love the look it gives the arrangements and it is compostable on the customer's end." "We are reinvesting all of our profit into our growth and bootstrapping," she says. "I'm really proud of that now." One area where she doesn't skimp is hiring. Stembel says she hires only full-time employees and offers a 401(k) plan. The startup currently employs 100 people. "I am very passionate about creating good jobs," says Stembel. "But the challenge is that it is so much more expensive. Our workers comp is more expensive than our medical insurance, and we offer full medical." Stembel says she looks to the future one day at a time, but has no plans on immediate selling the company or taking it public. "I don't know if we'll be acquired, or [do] an IPO, or grow really big. I don't know that I'll always be the CEO," she says. "I hope that I can learn enough to be a really good leader at every level." ...https://www.wthitv.com/content/national/500828842.html

Stanford engineers study hovering bats and hummingbirds in Costa Rica

Wednesday, October 17, 2018

It sounds like too big a study to embark on but that's what I dream about." ### Additional co-authors are Lukas Haizmann from the University of Bremen, who visited the Lentink Lab for his internship and master's thesis research. Lentink is also a member of Stanford Bio-X and the Stanford Neurosciences Institute, and an affiliate of the Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation and the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology Center of Excellence for Aeronautics and Astronautics at Stanford. Disclaimer: AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert system. https://www.eurekalert.org/pub_releases/2018-09/su-ses092418.php

Bremen man dies in weekend motorcycle crash

Thursday, September 13, 2018

A Bremen man was killed over the weekend following a one-vehicle crash in Kosciusko County south of North Webster.Kosciusko County Sheriffs Capt. Chris McKeand said 52-year-old James R. Ernsberger III was pronounced dead at Memorial Hospital in South Bend on Saturday after suffering head and neck injuries when he crashed his 2005 Harley-Davidson motorcycle. McKeand said Ernsberger was driving northbound on S.R. 13, near C.R. 200 North, shortly before 1:30 p.m. with a group of other motorcyclists when he laid down his motorcycle for an unknown reason and without making contact with another motorcyclist, according to a news release. Ernsberger was thrown from the motorcycle and was unresponsive by the time the other motorcyclists reached him. A helicopter flew Ernsberger to Memorial, but he died of his injuries. The crash remains under investigation, according to McKeand. Ernsberger had been taking part in a 9/11 charity ride when the crash happened, according to an obituary posted on the...http://www.thepilotnews.com/content/bremen-man-dies-weekend-motorcycle-crash